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Seth Godin

Seth Godin

One of the world’s best marketers, entrepreneurs and bestselling author of 10 books
Language : English

  • Categories

  • Entrepreneurship
    • Successful Entrepreneurs (male)
  • Innovation & Creativity
    • Innovation
  • Marketing
    • Online Marketing / E-commerce
  • Employability

  • Lecture
  • Consultancy
  • Subjects

  • Marketing
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Information age

Seth Godin, author of 'Tribes', is one of the world’s most popular bloggers and the author of ten bestselling books. He has established several new paradigms that have changed the way people think about marketing, change, and work. In 1995 Godin founded Yoyodyne, the first interactive direct marketing company, which Yahoo! acquired in late 1998. A year later he forever changed the relationship between businesses and their customers with his influential bestseller 'Permission

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Seth Godin, author of 'Tribes', is one of the world’s most popular bloggers and the author of ten bestselling books. He has established several new paradigms that have changed the way people think about marketing, change, and work. In 1995 Godin founded Yoyodyne, the first interactive direct marketing company, which Yahoo! acquired in late 1998. A year later he forever changed the relationship between businesses and their customers with his influential bestseller 'Permission Marketing'. Ahead of the curve again in 2000, Godin was one of the first to explain the power of viral marketing in 'Unleashing the Ideavirus', the most popular e-book of all time. During the downturn of 2001, Godin identified adaptability as the most important survival skill in 'Survival is not Enough', a timely bestseller that applied Darwin to business. Always in touch with the most pressing business concerns of the moment, Godin showed businesses how to escape commodification and stand out from the herd in 'Purple Cow', Amazon's number one bestselling marketing book of 2003. Then he showed that free small ideas can propel more growth than big expensive ideas with his 2004 bestseller 'Free Prize Inside!'. In 2005 Godin edited 'The Big Moo', a collection of short pieces by the world's leading business thinkers, and he also revealed the power of storytelling in generating demand in his bestseller 'All Marketers are Liars'. In 2006 he once again challenged our most basic assumptions by revealing the declining power of size and other new trends in 'Small Is the New Big'. And in the spring of 2007 Godin hit the 'New York Times' and 'BusinessWeek' bestseller lists with 'The Dip', which explores how strategic quitting is essential to becoming number one. His most recent book, 'Meatball Sundae', hit the 'Wall Street Journal' bestseller list and warned of the mess made by dabbling in Web 2.0 marketing without first adapting your organization. Currently Godin is hard at work on Squidoo, an innovative online network he founded in 2005, which allows anyone to build a web page on a topic of interest. He holds an MBA from Stanford, and was called "the Ultimate Entrepreneur for the Information Age" by 'BusinessWeek'. Forbes.com recently called Godin "a demigod on the Web, a best-selling author, highly sought after lecturer, successful entrepreneur, respected pundit and high-profile blogger." This year Spock.com, a people search site, found that Seth Godin was the most searched blogger of any kind with 2.25 million searches. He is also ranked by 'Advertising Age' as the number one marketing blogger.

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Cover van Tribes

Tribes

Title:
 
Tribes
Subtitle:
 
We Need You to Lead Us
Author:
 
Seth Godin
Book:
 
Hardcover, 151 pages
ISBN:
 
978-15-918-4233-0
 
 
 

Short on pages but long on repetition, this newest book by Godin (Purple Cow) argues that lasting and substantive change can be best effected by a tribe: a group of people connected to each other, to a leader and to an idea. Smart innovators find or assemble a movement of similarly minded individuals and get the tribe excited by a new product, service or message, often via the Internet (consider, for example, the popularity of the Obama campaign, Facebook or Twitter). Tribes, Godin says, can be within or outside a corporation, and almost everyone can be a leader; most are kept from realizing their potential by fear of criticism and fear of being wrong. The book's helpful nuggets are buried beneath esoteric case studies and multiple reiterations: we can be leaders if we want, tribes are the way of the future and change is good. On that last note, the advice found in this book should be used with caution. Change isn't made by asking permission, Godin says. Change is made by asking forgiveness, later. That may be true, but in this economy and in certain corporations, it may also be a good way to lose a job.