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Professor Xiaobo Zhang

Professor Xiaobo Zhang

“National 1000-Talent Program” chair professor of economics at Peking University, and senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
Languages : English, Chinese

  • Categories

  • Administration, Governance & Politics
  • Economy & Finance
  • Employability

  • Lecture
  • Subjects

  • Economic consequences of China’s demographic transition (rising sex ratios and aging)
  • China’s economic transformation
  • China’s industrial relocation and upgrade
  • China investment in Africa

Xiaobo Zhang is a “National 1000-Talent Program” chair professor of economics and deputy dean at the National School of Development, Peking University, and senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). His research fields are Chinese economy and development economics. He has published widely in top economics journals, such as Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Development Economics, Journal of International Economics, and Journal of Public Economics.

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Xiaobo Zhang is a “National 1000-Talent Program” chair professor of economics and deputy dean at the National School of Development, Peking University, and senior research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI). His research fields are Chinese economy and development economics. He has published widely in top economics journals, such as Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Development Economics, Journal of International Economics, and Journal of Public Economics. His recent books include Governing Rapid Growth in China: Equity and Institutions (2009), Regional Inequality in China: Trends, Explanations and Policy Responses (2009), Narratives of Chinese Economic Reforms: How Does China Cross the River?, and Oxford Companion to the Economics of China (forthcoming). He is a Co-editor of China Economic Review. He was selected as the president of Chinese Economists Society from 2005 to 2006.

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