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Johan Norberg

Johan Norberg

Author, lecturer and documentary filmmaker
Languages : English, Swedish

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Johan Norberg is an author, lecturer and documentary filmmaker, born in 1973. A native of Sweden, he lectures about entrepreneurship, global trends and globalization around the world. He is a frequent commentator in Swedish and international media, and has a regular column in Sweden’s biggest daily, Metro.

The 15 books he has written and the 3 books he has edited cover a broad range of topics, including global economics, intellectual history and the science of happiness.

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Johan Norberg is an author, lecturer and documentary filmmaker, born in 1973. A native of Sweden, he lectures about entrepreneurship, global trends and globalization around the world. He is a frequent commentator in Swedish and international media, and has a regular column in Sweden’s biggest daily, Metro.

The 15 books he has written and the 3 books he has edited cover a broad range of topics, including global economics, intellectual history and the science of happiness.

In 2001, Johan Norberg published the international bestseller In Defense of Global Capitalism, credited with changing the globalization debate at a time when the anti-globalization, anti-free trade protests were at their strongest. The book has been translated to 25 languages, including Chinese, Russian, Turkish and Arabic, and published worldwide.

In Financial Times, Samuel Brittan wrote: ”Giving clear and verifiable sources, Norberg nails one by one the fallacies and selective statistics that are used by the anti-capitalist protesters.”

More recently Norberg has written about the financial crisis in Financial Fiasco, which the The Spectator named one of the “Best Books of 2009”, and Financial Times called ”good descriptive history and a welcome addition to the literature”.

Norberg has been particularly celebrated for an ability to make complex ideas easily accessible for a broad audience. Times Literary Supplement has called him ”Frédéric Bastiat’s talented modern heir”, recalling the popular French 19th century economist.

Johan Norberg also regularly writes and hosts documentaries on development and economics, in most cases for British and American television, including Globalization is Good (2003), Overdose : The Next Financial Crisis (2010), Free or Equal (2011), and most recently Economic Freedom in Action: Changing Lives (2013).

Since 2012, he is the youngest ever board member of the Mont Pelerin Society, the prestigious international organization for classical liberal scholars and thinkers, which has counted 8 winners of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences among its members.

Johan Norberg is a Senior Fellow at the Cato Institute in Washington D.C., and a Senior Fellow at the European Centre for International Political Economy in Brussels. He received his M. A. in the History of Ideas from the University of Stockholm.

For his trailblazing international work, Johan Norberg has received the Distinguished Sir Antony Fisher Memorial Award from the American Atlas Foundation, and the gold medal from the German Hayek Stiftung (9 ounces), which he received simultaneously with former UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher from the hands of former German President Roman Herzog. He has also received numerous Swedish prizes and awards.

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Universiteit van het leven

Ludo Daems

“The keynote speaker at the conference was the Swedish economist and historian Johan Norberg. He is the author of the book "Progress, Ten Reasons to Look Out to the Future". Despite the bad news from all over the world which is overpowering us daily, he refuses to look to the future in a pessimistic way. On the contrary during his lecture he showed an unrestrained strong faith in the future. To substantiate this belief he refers to 10 reasons to be optimistic about the future, because we have made more progress in the past 100 years than in the first 100.000. We are overwhelmed by feelings of fear Norberg says, and yet statistics show that it was never better than now. According to Norberg, we better put our energy in a positive view of the world. Norberg made his point in an enthusiastic and passionate way. Hopefully he can even bring us more better news when we will meet him next time.”